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National average asking price reaches record high of $497,840

Posted on: December 4th, 2014 | Filed in Featured, NZ Property Report, Property Investing

November saw a 1.9% increase over the previous month in the national average asking price of homes for sale, reaching an all-time high of $497,840. In addition, the number of new property listings remains high with 13,512 new listings in November, a 2% lift on the same month last year. The November property data was released today by Realestate.co.nz, the website with New Zealand’s largest number of homes for sale.

“The New Zealand property market continues to be robust, with a very healthy number of new listings heading into summer. The new all-time high in the average asking price reflects the confidence of vendors across the country, rather than one particular region,” says Marketing Manager for Realestate.co.nz, Paul McKenzie.

The asking price of homes for sale rose in nine out of 19 regions across the country, with no one single region reaching an all-time high in its own right. However, some parts of New Zealand experienced significant jumps which contributed to the new all-time national high. In particular, the Central Otago/Lakes district saw a 12% surge in asking price from the previous month, reaching $747,781. The Waikato experienced an 8.2% increase, rising from $361,512 to $391,137. Other regions which saw big jumps in asking price in November included the Wairarapa (5.9%), Northland (5.4%) and Taranaki (5.1%).

The average asking price in Auckland also climbed in November by 4.9% back to near record levels, reaching $731,588, while Wellington and Canterbury stayed at the same high levels achieved in the preceding months, experiencing average asking prices of $463,925 and $454,305 respectively.

The number of new listings in November is higher than the same time last year. In particular, Canterbury saw a significant jump of 16.8% from November last year, with 1,829 new listings of homes for sale. New listings in Wellington also climbed significantly by 10.1% to 1,222. Other regions which experienced big jumps in new listings included Manawatu/Wanganui (20%), Southland (19.7%), Central Otago/Lakes (13.6%) and the Waikato (4.9%).

Other Graphs:
SA_AskingPriceTotalNewListings

InventorySA_MMAMap3_Regional_map_of_inventory_NZ_Property_Report

 

For Media Enquiries, please contact:

Paul McKenzie, National Marketing Manager, Realestate.co.nz | +64 21 618 537

A full copy to the Press Release is available here – download now.

Notes:

Truncated mean The monthly asking price for new listings presented in this report utilises the measure of ‘truncated mean’. This measure is judged to be a more accurate measure of the market price than average price as it statistically removes the extremes that exist within any property market that can so easily introduce a skew to traditional average price figures. The truncated mean used in this report removes the upper 10% and the lower 10% of listings in each data set.

Methodology The realestate.co.nz data is compiled from new listings coming onto the market from the more than 1,000 licensed real estate offices across NZ, representing more than 97% of all offices. With an average monthly level of over 11,000 new listings, the realestate.co.nz data provides the largest monthly sample on the residential property market.

Seasonally adjustment The core data is seasonally adjusted to better represent the core underlying trend of the property market in NZ. In preparing this seasonally adjusted data Realestate.co.nz is grateful for the assistance of the New Zealand Institute of Economic Research (NZIER) who use an X12 ARIMA methodology to calculate seasonally adjusted data.

Background to Realestate.co.nz Realestate.co.nz Ltd is the official online property listing company of the New Zealand real estate industry, currently hosting over 100,000 listings, covering this portfolio of residential property for sale and rent, commercial property for sale and lease, rural properties and farms, as well as businesses for sale.  The raw property report data is accessible here as an Excel spreadsheet enabling anyone to analyse the raw data and establish any trends or observations. Usage rights are governed under attribution to the source of the data being Realestate.co.nz.

By Paul McKenzie, Marketing Manager, Realestate.co.nz

If you have any comments or enquiries about the NZ Property Market or about marketing your property online, please contact me via Google, or Linkedin

 

1

NZ Property Report – January 2013

The January 2013 NZ Property Report published by Realestate.co.nz provides an insight into the state of the New Zealand property market as measured by the supply side of the property market over the month of January. The key measures of the market analysed in the report are the number of new listings, the asking price expectation for those new listings and the level of inventory of unsold houses on the market at this time. The report is compiled from data captured by the website and represents close to 97% of all property movements in the NZ market as managed by licensed real estate agents.

A full print version of the NZ Property Report – January 2013 is published below and is available for download (1.2MB) and distribution.

Summary of the market – January 2013

Property market remains tight over summer as buyer interest surges to record heights

The first month of the year is traditionally a quiet period, with significantly less business days, and therefore listings coming onto the market tend to be subdued. This trend continued in 2013, with the New Year starting with both low levels of inventory of properties for sale, and a sluggish flow of new listings. Website traffic in January was a different story though, with over 1.5 million visits to Realestate.co.nz, hitting a new record (source – Google Analytics). It will be interesting to see how this increase in traffic translates into the REINZ sales data for January (released in the second week of February) and into both sales and new listings in February.

Asking prices rebounded in January, with the national (seasonally adjusted) mean reaching $440,507, just shy of the record asking prices seen in November last year of $446,277. This asking price increase was mainly driven by the Auckland market, which reached $607,226 (over $600,000 for a second time in history).

While some stabilisation was seen in January, inventory levels across the country remain low and the market remains a firm seller’s market across 13 of New Zealand’s 19 regions.

 

Asking Price

The seasonally adjusted truncated mean asking price for listings in January rose by 4% to $440,507. It represents a 5% year-on-year growth in the asking price as compared to January last year. The highest year-on-year growth was seen in Auckland, rising 12.4% to $607,226.

The trend as seen in the chart opposite, continues to show strength in seller expectation, on the back of low listings, and strong demand in the main centers

 

New Listings

The level of new listings coming onto the market in January rose on a seasonally adjusted basis, with a total of 8,849 new listings, representing a modest 4% year-on-year raise.

On a 12 month moving average basis a total of 132,550 new listings have come onto the market since January 2012 as compared to 124,990 in the prior 12-month period, this represents a rise of 6%.

 

Inventory

The level of unsold houses on the market at the end of January (43,506) was up slightly, when compared to December (42,513). The inventory as measured in terms of equivalent weeks of sales rose in January to 28.7 weeks, the same levels seen in November last year

While this increase in the last month was seen in 13 of the 19 NZ regions, the market remains firmly a seller’s market, and inventory on the market remains well below the long-term average of 39 weeks of equivalent sales.

 

Regional Summary – Asking price expectations

The national (seasonally adjusted) truncated mean asking price expectation among sellers rose by 4.2% in January to $440,507.

The main centers, Auckland, and Canterbury reported a rise in the asking price in January. Auckland rose 3.3% to $607,226, and Canterbury rose 3.5% to $402,742. Wellington reported a slight fall in asking price of -0.3% to $433,347.

In total 9 regions reported asking price increases, and 4 regions saw rises greater than 5%. The most significant rises were seen in Otago, Central Otago / Lakes, Northland, and Marlbourgh, with Otago showing the largest increase, up 8% to a record high of $299,845. Of the 10 regions witnessing asking price falls on a seasonally adjusted basis there were 6 that reported falls of greater than 5% with Southland falling by 14.6% to $225,541, Gisborne falling by 14.4% to $287,573, Wairarapa falling by 9.5% to $272,996, Coromandel falling 6.5% to $403,748, Nelson fell 6% to $424,463 and Manawatu/Wanganui fell 5.5% to $255,879.

A new record high asking price was seen in Otago, rising by 8% to $299,845.

 

Regional Summary – Listings

Overall new listings increased on a national basis, as seen in the adjacent chart and across the regions there were slightly more regions showing increases than falls.

There were 6 regions reporting year-on-year falls, with significant falls (over 20%) seen in just 1 region, Taranaki – falling by 30.8% when compared to January 2012.

11 regions reported higher new listings than January last year with Gisborne being the region to report the highest increase of 41.1% when compared to January 2012, followed by Otago who saw an increase of 27.2%, Central North Is with an increase of 24%, and Southland who saw an increase of 20.5%.

The data month for February will be interesting to review, as it is traditionally one of the biggest listing months of the year. Last year that total was over 13,000, Auckland seeing the majority with over 4,500 coming to the market.

Regional Summary – Inventory

The inventory of unsold homes on the market stabilised in January – rising back to November levels of 29 weeks of equivalent sales from 27 weeks (on a seasonally adjusted basis).

Four regions (West Coast, Southland, Gisborne and Taranaki) showed increases in inventory of homes on the market taking them above their respective long-term average. In addition two other regions (Otago and Wairarapa) sit close to their respective long-term averages.

Market sentiment continues to favour sellers in 13 regions, with the greatest strain being felt in the 7 regions that are marked in darker blue. This includes the main metro areas of Auckland, and Canterbury which remain under pressure from low listings as measured against sales activity. 

Auckland saw some stabilisation of inventory levels in January, rising from the record low seen in December of 14 weeks, to 15 weeks of inventory in January.

 

Lifestyle

New lifestyle property listings fell across the country in January, dropping 19.8% when compared to December. A total of 652 listings came onto the market, showing a fall of 2.8% when compared to January last year. The truncated mean asking price for these listings was up by 1.4% as compared to the recent 3-month average to an asking price of $653,269 (up 5.2% when compared to January 2012). New record high asking prices were seen in one region in New Zealand (Otago $600,500).

 

Apartments

New listings for apartments in January were up 16.8% on a year on year basis, with 334 being brought to the market. The truncated mean asking price of new apartment listings rose 1.9% to $385,821 in January from $378,750 in December, and was up 10.3% on a year on year basis. 

The Auckland apartment market had 197 new listings coming onto the market, up 10% when compared to January last year. The truncated mean asking price of new listings in Auckland rose to $375,887 (January) from $352,787 (December). When compared to the recent 3-month average, this represents a rise of 0.5%.

 

For Media Enquiries, please contact: Paul McKenzie, Realestate.co.nz | +64 21 618 537

Notes:

Truncated mean

The monthly asking price for new listings presented in this report utilises the measure of ‘truncated mean’. This measure is judged to be a more accurate measure of the market price than average price as it statistically removes the extremes that exist within any property market that can so easily introduce a skew to traditional average price figures.

The truncated mean used in this report removes the upper 10% and the lower 10% of listings in each data set. An average or mean of the balance of listings is then calculated.

 

Methodology

With the largest database of properties for sale in NZ from licensed real estate agents, realestate.co.nz is uniquely placed to immediately identify any changes in the marketplace. The realestate.co.nz NZ Property Report is compiled from new listings coming onto the market from the more than 1,000 licensed real estate offices across NZ, representing more than 96% of all offices.

With an average monthly level of over 10,000 new listings, the realestate.co.nz NZ Property Report provides the largest monthly sample report on the residential property market, as well as a more timely view of the property market than any other property report. The data is collated and analysed at the close of each month, and the Report is compiled for the 1st day of the following month. This provides a feedback mechanism as to the immediate state of the market, well in advance of sales statistics, which by the very nature of the selling process can reflect activity with a lag of between 2 and 4 months.

 

Seasonally adjustment

The core data for the NZ Property Report is seasonally adjusted to better represent the core underlying trend of the property market in NZ. In preparing this seasonally adjusted data Realestate.co.nz is grateful for the assistance of the New Zealand Institute of Economic Research (NZIER) who use an X12 ARIMA methodology to calculate seasonally adjusted data.

 

Background to Realestate.co.nz

Realestate.co.nz is the official website company of the real estate industry of New Zealand, it is an industry owned web business providing online marketing services to the real estate industry. The shareholders in the business comprise the REINZ (50%) and five of the largest real estate companies (50%).

The business operates a portfolio of websites all focused to specialist sectors of the real estate market:

Realestate.co.nz is the heart of the business and is focused to the residential property market. It features the most comprehensive selection of property for sale and rent across NZ. The website attracts a significant monthly audience of over 475,000 unique browsers, with over 115,000 of those visiting from countries outside of NZ.

In addition Realestate.co.nz receives over 29% of all traffic to property listings from mobile devices, including their iPhone and Android applications. To date these applications have been downloaded by over 134,000 users making the app the most popular property app in NZ.

nzFarms is a specialist website presenting the most comprehensive selection of farms and agricultural businesses on the market across NZ. At this time it features around 5,000 listings for all types of farms and agricultural land as well as over 11,000 lifestyle properties.

Prime Commercial is a specialist website presenting the most comprehensive selection of commercial property for purchase or lease on the market across NZ. At this time it features over 27,000 listings for all types of properties – retail, commercial, industrial and investment properties.

Prime Business is a specialist website presenting the most comprehensive selection of businesses for sale on the market across NZ. At this time it features over 4,300 listings for all types of businesses – retail, tourism, wholesale as well as franchise opportunities.

The web business of Realestate.co.nz site is the most comprehensive real estate web operation in NZ, currently hosting over 110,000 listings, covering this portfolio of residential property for sale and rent, commercial property for sale and lease, rural properties and farms, as well as businesses for sale. With a subscriber base of over 1,000 offices, the company represents over 97% of all listings from licensed real estate agents in NZ.

The full NZ Property Report for January 2013 can be downloaded here (1.2MB pdf document). Additionally the raw data is accessible here as an Excel spreadsheet enabling anyone to analyse the raw data and establish any trends or observations.

Usage rights are governed under attribution to the source of the data being Realestate.co.nz. The next NZ Property Report for February 2013 will be published on this website on 1st March 2013 at 11am.

By Paul McKenzie, Marketing Manager, Realestate.co.nz

2

NZ Property Report – November 2012

The November 2012 NZ Property Report published by Realestate.co.nz provides an insight into the state of the New Zealand property market as measured by the supply side of the property market over the month of November. The key measures of the market analysed in the report are the number of new listings, the asking price expectation for those new listings and the level of inventory of unsold houses on the market at this time. The report is compiled from data captured by the website and represents close to 97% of all property movements in the NZ market as managed by licensed real estate agents.

A full print version of the NZ Property Report – November 2012 is published below and is available for download (1.2MB) and distribution.

Summary of the market – November 2012

Inventory hits 5 year low and adds growing pressure to the property market

The message coming from the property market is that buyers are out and about and are keen to get into the market. This eagerness to buy is matched by the availability of attractive mortgage packages, but is not being met with sufficient supply of new property listings, which is continuing to drive the current sellers market.

Inventory levels across the country remain low and the market remains a firms sellers market across 15 of NZ’s 19 regions. Overall stocks of unsold homes fell to a 5 year low of 28.7 weeks of inventory (long term average = 39 weeks). Auckland was again the most affected by low inventory levels, with stocks of unsold homes falling to a new low of 15.5 weeks of inventory, well below the long term average of 31 weeks.

The REINZ Residential Market Statistics reports strong property sales with 6,640 properties sold in October, up 33% on a year ago, and yet listing flow is not matching with just a 1.5% year on year growth. This is why the inventory supply of the property on the market (as measured by rate of sale) has fallen 29% in the past year.

This confidence on the part of sellers is certainly supported by the rate of sale of property which is being shared by real estate agents in their daily contact with the public, and can also be seen in traffic to Realestate.co.nz which has seen an increase this year of 40%, with over 1,400,000 monthly visitor sessions across all sites (Google Analytics).

 

Asking Price

The seasonally adjusted truncated mean asking price for listings steadied, rising just 0.2% to high of $446,277 in November.

The trend (as seen in the chart opposite) very clearly shows an accelerating growth in asking price over the recent 12 months (as compared to 2010/11) and shows continued strength in seller expectations.

 

New Listings

The level of new listings coming onto the market in November continued to increase, with 13,571 listings in the month – up from 12,688 in October (7% increase). However listings were only slightly up by 1.5% on November last year.

On a 12 month moving total basis the number of new listings that have come onto the market in the last year totals 132,493, as compared to 124,940 in the prior 12-month period, this represents a rise of 6%.

 

Inventory

The level of unsold houses on the market at the end of November (45,228) was up, when compared to October (43,410). The inventory as measured in terms of equivalent weeks of sales fell to a 5 year low last month to 28.7 weeks last month. This fall was witnessed across 15 of the 19 regions.

With the rising rate of property sales, the inventory on the market has seen a significant drop over the last 12 months pushing it well below the long-term average of 39 weeks of equivalent sales.

 

Regional Summary – Asking price expectations

The national (seasonally adjusted) truncated mean asking price expectation among sellers rose just 0.2% in November to a new high of $446,277.

In the main centers, Auckland, Wellington, and Christchurch all reported a fall in the asking price in November. Auckland fell 2.5% to $596,759, Wellington fell 4.2% to $431,259 and Canterbury fell 2% to $405,913.

In total 10 regions reported asking price increases, and 5 regions saw rises greater than 5%. The most significant rises were seen in the Central North Island, Northland, Manawatu/Wanganui and Southland with Central North Island showing the largest increases, up 6.9% to $369,390. Of the 9 regions witnessing asking price falls on a seasonally adjusted basis there was 3 that reported a falls of greater than 5% with Gisborne falling by 14.4% to $250,866, Hawkes Bay falling by 10.3% to $321,454 and Wairarapa falling 7.3% to $254,194

 

Regional Summary – Listings

Overall new listings increased on a national basis, as seen in the adjacent chart however across the regions there were slightly more regions showing increases than falls.

There were 11 regions reporting year-on-year rises, with significant increases (over 20%) seen in just 2 regions, the largest increases were in Gisborne (25%), and Otago (20%).

7 regions reported lower new listings than November last year with the Central North Island being the region to report the highest fall off of 35.8% when compared to November 2011, Followed by Northland who saw a fall of 21%

 

Regional Summary – Inventory

The inventory of unsold homes on the market tightened significantly in March – Falling to a new low of 28.7 weeks off equivalent sales from 33 weeks (on a seasonally adjusted basis).

Four regions (Southland, West Coast, Coromandel, and Wairarapa) showed increases in inventory of homes on the market taking them above their respective long-term average. In addition one other region (Manawatu / Wanganui) sits close to it’s respective long term average.

Market sentiment now favours sellers in 14 regions, with the greatest strain being felt in the 8 regions which are marked in dark blue, which includes the main metro areas of Auckland, Wellington, and Canterbury which remain under pressure from low listings as measured against sales activity.

 

Lifestyle

New lifestyle property listings fell across the country in November, dropping 4.9% when compared to October. A total of 1,066 listings came onto the market, showing a fall of 5.9% when compared to November last year. The truncated mean asking price for these listings was down by 1.5% as compared to the recent 3-month average to an asking price of $654,519 (up 13.9% when compared to October 2011). New record high asking prices were seen in 2 regions in New Zealand (Waikato – $675,581, and Central Otago/Lakes – $1,596,071).

 

Apartments

New listings for apartments in November down 9.5% on a year on year basis, with 484 being brought to the market. The truncated mean asking price of new apartment listings fell 1% to $394,282 in November from $398,121 in October, but was still up 6.4% on a year on year basis.

The Auckland apartment market had 304 new listings coming onto the market, down 13.1% when compared to November last year. The truncated mean asking price of new listings in Auckland rose again to $386,818 (November) from $382,303 (October) representing a 2.2% increase on the prior 3 months.

 

For Media Enquiries, please contact: Paul McKenzie, Realestate.co.nz | +64 21 618 537

Notes:

Truncated mean

The monthly asking price for new listings presented in this report utilises the measure of ‘truncated mean’. This measure is judged to be a more accurate measure of the market price than average price as it statistically removes the extremes that exist within any property market that can so easily introduce a skew to traditional average price figures.

The truncated mean used in this report removes the upper 10% and the lower 10% of listings in each data set. An average or mean of the balance of listings is then calculated.

 

Methodology

With the largest database of properties for sale in NZ from licensed real estate agents, realestate.co.nz is uniquely placed to immediately identify any changes in the marketplace. The realestate.co.nz NZ Property Report is compiled from new listings coming onto the market from the more than 1,000 licensed real estate offices across NZ, representing more than 96% of all offices.

With an average monthly level of over 10,000 new listings, the realestate.co.nz NZ Property Report provides the largest monthly sample report on the residential property market, as well as a more timely view of the property market than any other property report. The data is collated and analysed at the close of each month, and the Report is compiled for the 1st day of the following month. This provides a feedback mechanism as to the immediate state of the market, well in advance of sales statistics, which by the very nature of the selling process can reflect activity with a lag of between 2 and 4 months.

 

Seasonally adjustment

The core data for the NZ Property Report is seasonally adjusted to better represent the core underlying trend of the property market in NZ. In preparing this seasonally adjusted data Realestate.co.nz is grateful for the assistance of the New Zealand Institute of Economic Research (NZIER) who use an X12 ARIMA methodology to calculate seasonally adjusted data.

 

Background to Realestate.co.nz

Realestate.co.nz is the official website company of the real estate industry of New Zealand, it is an industry owned web business providing online marketing services to the real estate industry. The shareholders in the business comprise the REINZ (50%) and five of the largest real estate companies (50%).

The business operates a portfolio of websites all focused to specialist sectors of the real estate market:

Realestate.co.nz is the heart of the business and is focused to the residential property market. It features the most comprehensive selection of property for sale and rent across NZ. The website attracts a significant monthly audience of over 475,000 unique browsers, with over 115,000 of those visiting from countries outside of NZ.

In addition Realestate.co.nz receives over 25% of all traffic to property listings from mobile devices, including their iPhone and Android applications. To date these applications have been downloaded by over 122,000 users making the app the most popular property app in NZ.

nzFarms is a specialist website presenting the most comprehensive selection of farms and agricultural businesses on the market across NZ. At this time it features around 5,000 listings for all types of farms and agricultural land as well as over 11,000 lifestyle properties.

Prime Commercial is a specialist website presenting the most comprehensive selection of commercial property for purchase or lease on the market across NZ. At this time it features over 27,000 listings for all types of properties – retail, commercial, industrial and investment properties.

Prime Business is a specialist website presenting the most comprehensive selection of businesses for sale on the market across NZ. At this time it features over 4,300 listings for all types of businesses – retail, tourism, wholesale as well as franchise opportunities.

The web business of Realestate.co.nz site is the most comprehensive real estate web operation in NZ, currently hosting over 110,000 listings, covering this portfolio of residential property for sale and rent, commercial property for sale and lease, rural properties and farms, as well as businesses for sale. With a subscriber base of over 1,000 offices, the company represents over 97% of all listings from licensed real estate agents in NZ.

The full NZ Property Report for November 2012 can be downloaded here (1.2MB pdf document). Additionally the raw data is accessible here as an Excel spreadsheet enabling anyone to analyse the raw data and establish any trends or observations.

Usage rights are governed under attribution to the source of the data being Realestate.co.nz. The next NZ Property Report for December 2012 will be published on this website on Wednesday 2nd January 2013 at 11am.

By Paul McKenzie, Marketing Manager, Realestate.co.nz

6

Talking with our customers – interesting insights from recent survey

Posted on: September 2nd, 2011 | Filed in Buying / Selling a home, Featured, Property Investing, Renting, Website searching

We recently undertook a survey amongst our email subscriber database. What prompted this was a desire to learn more about the make up of this group of avid users of the site to see how we might improve the service we offer on Realestate.co.nz to buyers, sellers, investors, tenants and any other form of property hunting fanatic!

What we have discovered is very interesting and certainly worthy of sharing. If you participated in the survey; we really appreciate you taking the time to complete the survey and we hope with your help to repeat it again on maybe a quarterly basis as the data is valuable, and to see trends over time for some of the finding will be useful.

To start with we had 398 people complete the survey – a significant number and certainly large enough for the data to be representative of people in the market for property (we are not statisticians nor a research company so we are not trying to make any comment as to statistical margin of error etc).

The first question we asked was as to the status of the respondents.

The largest group (40%) are looking to buy property – this made up of 7% as first time buyers and 32% as general buyers. A fifth of respondents describe themselves as a landlord, with a further 7% saying that they are (or are looking to be) an investor.

Buyers

We then went on to ask the prospective buyers amongst the respondents when specifically they were looking to buy?

Not surprising was the fact that just under a third were looking to buy (we assume this is intent to be buying / searching actively as opposed to completing the purchase) in the next month. In total it would appear that over 60% of buyers are looking to be buying in the next 6 months in total, this would be expected as subscribers to the email are actively keeping tabs on the property market and receiving daily email alerts of new properties. We will be keen to ask this question again in the future to see how trends change over time by factor of market conditions and seasonality.

Additionally of interest is the fact that 11% are showing a reluctance to buy as they are waiting until the market improves.

Tenants – looking to buy

We also asked the same question of current tenants who expressed an intent to buy a property in the future. Their response was somewhat difference due to their circumstances.

Clearly the key issue for this group of respondents is the need to save for a deposit; a third of the respondents saw this as the key step to buying. Of the remainder 18% said they were looking to buy in the next 6 month, far less than active buyers, but interestingly a lower percentage (8%) felt that they would leave it until the market improves.

Type of property to buy

Going back to the group who are thinking of buying a property we asked them what type of property they were considering buying.

The majority of people (53%) looking to buy were interested in a property that would need a bit of work to be done – clearly the kiwi DIY mindset is still alive and well as people as still keen to add value to properties. This compared to just under a third who really wanted somewhere where the renovations had been completed and the property was ready to move in straight away.

Sellers

Moving from buyers to sellers we wanted to find out when those people who considered themselves sellers were looking to sell. The vast majority (83%) were looking to sell in the next 6 month, with 4 out of 10 thinking of selling in the next month, or at least putting their property on the market.

How would you sell?

We then posed an interesting question to those looking to sell. We asked them how they were looking to sell their property. Would they use a licensed agent, try and sell it themselves or might they give private selling a go, but more than likely end up using a licensed real estate agent. Having collated the results of this question we compared these with the recent Nielsen online real estate market survey asking the same question.

These results are very interesting. From both surveys the majority of respondents were likely to use a licensed agents, the sample respondents from the Realestate.co.nz email group were slightly more likely than the broader Nielsen market survey.

When it comes to selling privately the difference were significantly different, just 5% of the respondents to the Realestate.co.nz survey indicated that they would try and sell privately as against 11% for the broader Nielsen survey. Of note is the fact that the Nielsen survey was based on questionaires posted on both Trade Me and Realestate.co.nz and this is clearly showing that greater interest in private sales from Trade Me respondents to the Nielsen survey.

Investment Properties

The final set of questions we asked related to investment property. We asked those who described themselves as a landlord or investor how many properties they owned.

70% of those respondents who identified themselves as a landlord or investor had more than 2 properties with 14% having more than 5 properties. Clearly the Realestate.co.nz website is a core resource for investors looking to enhance their property portfolio.

Of these landlord we then asked if they used a Property Manager to manage their property / properties – or if they did themselves. Fully two thirds said that they managed their investment properties themselves with just one third using a professional property manager.

Probing a bit deeper we then asked them why they chose not to use a Property Manager.

Some useful insight here to assist the Property Management companies in providing support for this important sector of the property market.

 

 

6

Property investment loses its appeal – results of a new survey

Posted on: August 18th, 2010 | Filed in Buying / Selling a home, Featured, Property Investing

Investment property  Aug 2010Since the budget announcements in May as to the treatment of investment properties there has been extensive speculation as to the likely reaction of the investor segment of the property market.

The market both prior to May and subsequent to the announcement has shown virtually no movement (certainly no positive movement). The seasonally adjusted volumes for this year as represented in the chart (blue bars) track a very static level of around 4,500 per month well down on 2009 (green) and ominously close to 2008 (red).

REINZ sales Jul 2010

This sales data from the Real Estate Institute unfortunately provides no insight into the type of property purchased. However a recently released survey can now provide some valuable insight.

The annual Nielsen Real Estate Market Report 2010 now in its fifth year for which Realestate.co.nz is the primary sponsor has in the latest release highlighted a major flight of investors from the market comparing 2010 with prior years.

The survey, which is undertaken through an online intercept questionnaire, measures many aspects of the property buying and selling process. When it came to asking about buying intentions of the 1,225 survey respondents, it showed that their intention to buy an investment property had slumped by 40% in a year. Last year 1 in 4 of all those surveyed said that their intention was to buy an investment property. Just 12 months later when this survey was undertaken in May/June of this year that intention had slumped to just 1 in 7 – just 15%; the lowest level seen in the past 4 years of this annual survey.

Investors buying intention

Matched to this very clear intention of investment buyers was the fact that those who owned investment property were now far more likely to hold rather than sell – this is likely to be a clear factor in the slowing of the property market. Holders of investment property in the survey showed a 42% decline in intention to sell.

Investor intention to sell

Another aspect to the investor profile in the market is the likelihood that investors will target private sellers who they perceive as offering great deals in this “buyer’s market” – in the space of the last year there has been a 24% increase of intention by property investors to seek out private sellers as a source of property investment – 41% of investment buyers stated that they would prefer to buy privately.

Note: The Nielsen Real Estate Market Report is based on a website-intercept survey on New Zealand real estate websites conducted during May and June 2010 with a sample size of 1,225 respondents and a margin of error of 2.86%.
6

Baby boomer generation still sees the appeal of property

Posted on: July 11th, 2009 | Filed in Buying / Selling a home, Property Investing

Whilst by no means a statistically fullproof survey I was interested to read of 2 recent online surveys undertaken by the GrownUps.co.nz website – specifically targeting the demographic of the over 50’s – the baby boomer generation.

The first survey was undertaken in late June and asked the question “Are you considering buying or investing in property over the next 6 months?

GrownUps.co.nz website survey - property buyingThe results which provide an insight into the type of property that people are thinking of buying is most illuminating in that 75% stated that they are not considering buying or investing in property over the next 6 months – which by inference means that 25% – a full quarter of the 426 who took part in the survey are considering buying.

I found that very interesting set against the past 12 months of concern over property investing and the uncertainty of the property market especially within this baby boomer generation who by all accounts were disproportionately impacted by the finance company fallout.

Additionally the figure of 25% allowing for margin of error which in this same could be up to 8% would still mean 1 in 8 of this segment could be interested in property buying – far above the national average of 1 in 20. Consideration needs to be given to the fact that the survey was undertaken on a website which may be more representative of a higher socio-economic group.

The second survey undertaken by GrownUps just this week is also illuminating as it went on to seek response to the question “What are you most likely to invest in during the next 6 months?

GrownUps.co.nz website survey - investingThe results of this survey seeks to identify the interest in investing options for this baby boomer generation.

Most telling is the nearly a third of the 480 participants that state that “doing nothing” is their prefered action in regard to investing – not altogether surprising given the recent and current financial climate.

A quarter felt the bank safe deposit environment was the best option, as with 16% who felt that paying off debt was the best form of investment.

However a not insignificant 6% stated that their intention was property investment – that would equate to 1 in 17 of this every growing sector of the population. Again as against the current proportion of homeowners currently in the market based on current sales, if this representation of baby boomers were to go through with their intentions expressed in the survey it could have a part to play in the property market in the coming 6 months.

Clearly these surveys are a snapshot in time and provide no trend analysis to show movement as compared to prior year, but can be useful in observing the intentions and views of this influenctial proportion of the population.

10

Unlike shares, property almost always has a bottom price

Posted on: May 30th, 2009 | Filed in Buying / Selling a home, Property Investing

istock_000007480400xsmallOften comparisons are made between the property market and the share market, with the view that because the stock market has crashed, that in some way property prices will need to adjust by an order of similar magnitude.

As yet no international property market has seen a property price adjustment in terms of average house prices anywhere close to the collapses of stock markets over the past year. A commonly used expression to counter this comparison between equity and property markets is that “they are not making any more land these days”.

It was this thought that ran through my mind when I read this fascinating New York Times article on what the reporter sees as a bit of a buying frenzy at this moment for property in what must be one of the most depressed area of US property – Phoenix, Arizona (well one of a couple of markets which would include Florida, California and Nevada).

In this market where as a function of foreclosure (mortgagee sales) savvy investors have recently moving in and aggressively competing to buy up property as the current owners are ready to vacate and liquidate – offering those owners a lifeline at least from a lifestyle perspective. These investors are offering the opportunity for the owner to stay put and tenant the property at a rent lower than their recently re-adjusted mortgage payments, and thereby providing the investor with a secure tenant. This is effectively utilising the well established “sale and leaseback” model much favoured by commercial operations.

There is a great quote in the article from a real estate buyer who got burnt by buying into the falling market a year ago thinking it had bottomed – the classic “catch a falling knife syndrome” he says of his recent purchases:

“You need to buy when there’s blood in the streets,” he said with a shrug. “Even if it’s your own blood.”

The important point here is that unlike shares which effectively have no “floor price” – that is to say at some stage companies in liquidation or other state of collapse have zero value of shares. For property there is nearly always a price / value at which the market will actively and aggressively move in to buy. In this case in Phoenix that price is a massive discount to the once overheated bubble prices of a few years ago and clearly at a level which would show a paper loss for the owner, however the inherent asset value of almost all property does have a market value.

Note - If you have problems accessing the NY Times article a Pdf version is available here

5

Emerging concern over supply of new homes as consents plummet

The economic slowdown is firmly applying the brakes to the broad property market with the latest stats of building consents mirroring the record lows experienced in the real estate market.

The January stats show just 812 consented dwellings – the lowest since record began 34 years ago, with real estate sales in January at 3,706 the lowest since the early 90’s.

Whilst the median price for property is declining it is interesting to see that the average price of residential construction is actually increasing. Over the 9 month period from May 2008 to January 2009 the average value of residential consents rose from $310,000 to $393,000. Seen on this graph below the average value of consented residential construction on a 3 month moving average (red line) has now intersected with the average sales price of residential property again measured on a 3 month moving average basis (blue line).

NZ new home consents and property sales at Jan 09

This intersection is the first since early 2002 and highlights a couple of interesting trends.

  1. The very low level of new consents contain virtually no apartment developments so prevalent through the past decade which held consent values down.
  2. The market for new builds is maintained through more top end custom designed properties which is spiking the average, albeit from a low base of number of consents.

A consequence of this as highlight in the NBR is the very real possibility that such a drastic cut in new builds especially at the bottom end of the market generally serviced by group home builders could lead to a very real shortage of property with consequential impact on the supply side of the market.

And just before the howls begin from those that think we don’t need any more houses as the plane queue up to take kiwi’s to Australia it is worth reviewing the latest report from Statistics NZ which shows that despite the net record exodus to Australia of 35,400 in the 12 months to January 2009, the overall net migration was positive to the tune of 4,500 in the past year.

25

Young kiwis on their OE attracted to NZ property

Posted on: August 18th, 2008 | Filed in Property Investing
Kiwi OE in London

I was recently in London undertaking in partnership with Sable Mortgages a series of presentations on NZ property targeted at London based kiwis. It provided a great opportunity to profile the website and present a view of the NZ economy to a very well informed audience. During these sessions I was struck by two things.

1. There is an amazing wealth of young NZ talent in London that is so well connected and achieving success in business. By virtue of the web these kiwis know of everything going on back home

2. They are passionate and knowledgeable about home and all plan to return

The age old view of a “brain drain” has always been the political banner waved to justify poor economic performance, the fact is far from a brain drain as these kiwis are exercising their brains and gaining valuable insight into the wider world – they often leave penniless students and return asset rich and worldly wise adults ready to contribute to the development of this country. Sure they do not all return but over time a vast majority do and we as a country are better for it.

Returning to the subject of this post. Over the course of 4 nights of presentations over 250 attendees absorbed these presentations; keen to be better informed as to the opportunities of investing in property in NZ whilst they enjoy their time in the UK. The presentation was a classic situation of seeing that when you add it all up, you can see why for them investing in property in NZ makes sense – sometimes it just needs to be spelled out in black and white to reinforce the benefits.

  • No capital gains tax
  • No stamp duty – the UK Stamp duty is paid by property buyers, and is levied at 1 per cent for houses between £125,001 to £250,000, 3 per cent for £250,001 to £500,000 and 4 per cent for £500,001 or more
  • Ability to leverage equity from one property to another
  • Taxation benefits of LAQC
  • As prospective returning kiwis borrowing NZ dollars to buy NZ property presents no currency risk as the intention is to live in NZ in time
  • NZ lenders like UK based kiwis earning in GB pounds!

Added to this is the fact that even relative to salaries these kiwis can buy more for their money, take this situation as used in the presentation.

These 2 houses theoretically could have been bought 5 years ago – both for the price of £162,500 or NZ$427,000, the one on the left is a 5 bedroom house in Greenhithe on a good size section, the other a 3 bedroom semi in Hemel Hempstead (community distance to London – comparable access to each city’s CBD).

5 years down the track with appreciation as has been seen in both markets of a comparable 50% – each house now would could have been sold for respectively £250,000 and $657,500. The big difference though is the net return on that investment. In the UK allowing for stamp duty and capital gains tax and the slightly lower mortgage rates the return would be £65,000 or $170,000; however the NZ house would net the owners $215,000.

As ever we know analysis like this is always with the benefit of hindsight and today’s market is very different from 5 years ago, however the component costs and taxes haven’t changed (although there is demands in the UK for short term stamp duty relief to stoke the market from it’s stagnant position). All I can say is that over drinks (of course suitable stock of Speights, Stienlager and Marlborough Sauvingon Blanc) there was great interest from these UK pound cash rich kiwis keen to snap up some “good buys” in NZ for their planned return in a few years.

15

Buying your first property? – a new book offers valuable insight & advice

Posted on: August 3rd, 2008 | Filed in Buying / Selling a home, Money Matters, Property Investing

When it comes to the moment that you decide that you should take those first tentative steps on the property ladder, what you want is sound advice ideally from someone that you can not only trust – but also someone who understands what people of Gen Y really want and expect!

The answer to your questions, together with a “blow by blow” account of how to get started with investing in property is all detailed in a great new book “The Young and Singles Guide to Property Investment”. The book written by Jodi Cottle is a NZ book written to help young and single NZ’ers better understand buying a house / apartment / rental; it doesn’t really matter what your first step is going to be – you will be better off reading the book.

Jodi is a very smart young person who’s bought and sold close to half a dozen properties and she is yet to celebrate her 25th birthday. In addition she runs a mortgage advisory service (Sable Mortgages) based in Auckland with a spearate business supporting ex-pat kiwis based in London buy property in NZ. We have partnered with Jodi and Sable Mortgages to provide the realestate.co.nz mortgage advice service on the site – who better to advise and support prospective buyers than someone who has this kind of track record under their belt!

The book is written without the bluster of some of the books claiming to make you a millionaire by lunchtime – it is simple – yet at the same time comprehensive, but above all it is honest.

“I certainly don’t regret any of the decisions I have made, albeit that some have cost me money. I don’t regret anything because each occasion has taught me priceless lessons.”

The book charts in detail the process for the buying of her first 6 properties – again a candid sense of empathy pervades her descriptions

“I was so pleased to get rid of this property as the tenancy issues just continued to go from bad to worse. Again, this was another good lesson for me as I got to go through a mediation process with the tenants”

The book is currently for sale in most Whitcoulls around the country or you can buy a copy online from Jodi’s website for $24.99 – a great investment or gift for someone starting out on the property ladder.

Special Offer

Now we have secured 5 copies of this book to give away for free!!

What you have to do to win one of these copies is to submit a comment to this post with your recommendation of a property currently featured on the realestate.co.nz website that would be a great first home – just post the listing number or link. The first 5 to posts with suitable properties will recieve a copy of the book.

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